Uncategorized

Machine Learnings — Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures

Machine Learnings — Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures

Source

Awesome, not awesome.

#Awesome
Let’s say we offer a $500 monthly plan in which you can tap a button and get access to transportation whenever you want it, and you get to choose your room-on-wheels experience. Maybe you want a cup of coffee on your way to work, or you want to watch the Warriors game later, so you’re in what’s basically a sports bar, with a bartender. If 0.5 percent of all miles driven are done on a ride-sharing app, and then if that number increases to, say, 80 percent, it’ll be such a huge industry shift that even if only 2 percent of that 80 percent is done by human drivers, it still represents a drastic increase in the number of human ride-sharing drivers.”— John Zimmer, Co-Founder and President of LyftLearn More on The New York Times >

#Not Awesome
“She finds the notion of children empathizing with robots troublesome and quite possibly dangerous. Kids need connections to real people in order to mature emotionally. “Pretend empathy does not do the job,” she told me. If relationships with smart toys crowd out those with friends or family, even partially, we might see “children growing up without the equipment for empathic connection. You can’t learn it from a machine.” — Alexis C. Madrigal, Learn More on The Atlantic >

What we’re reading.

1/ When 20% of cars on the road are driven by algorithms, a single catastrophic human vs. machine collision could slow the adoption of autonomous vehicles for many years — but the upsides probably outweigh the downsides. Learn More on The New York Times >

2/ 100% car autonomy presents its own set of problems — but the most apparent? An utter lack of imagination. Social constructs, like cities, are so hardened in our minds that it’s difficult to picture a world that will be quite different from the one we all know. Learn More on The New York Times >

3/ All Algorithms are susceptible to manipulation by bad actors. Google, Facebook, and now YouTube are under fire for what the’ve let slip through their filters — but more stringent filters could make everything so much worse. Learn More on Polygon >

4/ In a world overloaded by information, content creators care above all else that you discover their information. How does it make you feel to know the content you consume exists for the sole reason that you discover it — and nothing deeper? Learn More on BLDGBLOG >

5/ The next time you swipe right in your data apps, you shouldn’t be so sure that you’re not connecting with an AI bot. Learn More on Motherboard >

6/ “Truck drivers” of tomorrow will operate the vehicles carrying their payload from hundreds of miles away from their phone or in front of their computers. Learn More on The Atlantic >

7/ Machine learning is actually to blame for adding the annoying “I” bug to your autocorrect in iOS. Learn More on Twitter >

What we’re building.

At work, our inboxes fill up quicker than we can empty them, key decisions are posted and immediately lost in Slack, and we forget the thousands of useful articles we’ve read that could help us do our jobs better. Information overload is wreaking havoc on our ability to process information, make decisions, and be productive.

We’re building Journal to help you remember and find all the important conversations, ideas, and knowledge you need to work faster.

Join our waitlist, and you’ll be one of the first people to get free access to our chrome extension. You’ll never forget important information or lose time recreating work again.

Where we’re going.

Highlight from “AI Ethics and the Race to Bring Pen and Paper Industries Online — A Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures”

Sam: …There are obvious benefits to bringing these processes and datasets online — but I doubt this will always be for the good.

For example, earlier this year the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election integrity sent out a request for voter roll data (name, address, dob, political party, voter history, SSN) from states to “fully analyze vulnerabilities and issues related to voter registration and voting.”

One doesn’t have to think too hard to imagine how this data could be abused to suppress voting from specific populations.

Now that machine learning allows us to process and draw connections between ever larger data sets, how should developers decide which ones are ethical to work on?

Leo: To be honest I don’t have a good answer for this. Everyone has their own code of ethics, and individuals will have to make the personal call as to whether or not they’re okay with the potential impact of the algorithms they build.

Technology is like science in many ways. It has the potential for good. It has the potential for evil.

You can use Google to diagnose if you’re having a heart attack, or to find instructions on bomb making.

It’s up to people building products to think critically about the societal and ethical implications of their work. It’s the unfortunate truth that many things built with the best intentions can be abused for evil. It’s a tough question.

Read the full conversation with Leo Polovets >

Links from the community.

“Job Security: What happens when AI takes over web design?” by Josh Aarons (@joshaarons). Learn More on Noteworthy >
“How Clarifai Buils Accurate and Unbiased AI Technology” submitted by Avi Eisenberger (@aeisenberger). Learn More on Clarifai >
“Business questions engineers should ask when interviewing at ML/AI companies” submitted by Samiur Rahman (@samiur1204). Learn More on Medium >
“Importance Of Bloomberg’s Article On Apple’s AI Headset Project” submitted by Carl DeBrule (@carldebrule). Learn More on Seeking Alpha >

Published at Mon, 13 Nov 2017 18:39:57 +0000

8 0

Machine Learnings — Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures

Machine Learnings — Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures

Source

Awesome, not awesome.

#Awesome
Let’s say we offer a $500 monthly plan in which you can tap a button and get access to transportation whenever you want it, and you get to choose your room-on-wheels experience. Maybe you want a cup of coffee on your way to work, or you want to watch the Warriors game later, so you’re in what’s basically a sports bar, with a bartender. If 0.5 percent of all miles driven are done on a ride-sharing app, and then if that number increases to, say, 80 percent, it’ll be such a huge industry shift that even if only 2 percent of that 80 percent is done by human drivers, it still represents a drastic increase in the number of human ride-sharing drivers.”— John Zimmer, Co-Founder and President of LyftLearn More on The New York Times >

#Not Awesome
“She finds the notion of children empathizing with robots troublesome and quite possibly dangerous. Kids need connections to real people in order to mature emotionally. “Pretend empathy does not do the job,” she told me. If relationships with smart toys crowd out those with friends or family, even partially, we might see “children growing up without the equipment for empathic connection. You can’t learn it from a machine.” — Alexis C. Madrigal, Learn More on The Atlantic >

What we’re reading.

1/ When 20% of cars on the road are driven by algorithms, a single catastrophic human vs. machine collision could slow the adoption of autonomous vehicles for many years — but the upsides probably outweigh the downsides. Learn More on The New York Times >

2/ 100% car autonomy presents its own set of problems — but the most apparent? An utter lack of imagination. Social constructs, like cities, are so hardened in our minds that it’s difficult to picture a world that will be quite different from the one we all know. Learn More on The New York Times >

3/ All Algorithms are susceptible to manipulation by bad actors. Google, Facebook, and now YouTube are under fire for what the’ve let slip through their filters — but more stringent filters could make everything so much worse. Learn More on Polygon >

4/ In a world overloaded by information, content creators care above all else that you discover their information. How does it make you feel to know the content you consume exists for the sole reason that you discover it — and nothing deeper? Learn More on BLDGBLOG >

5/ The next time you swipe right in your data apps, you shouldn’t be so sure that you’re not connecting with an AI bot. Learn More on Motherboard >

6/ “Truck drivers” of tomorrow will operate the vehicles carrying their payload from hundreds of miles away from their phone or in front of their computers. Learn More on The Atlantic >

7/ Machine learning is actually to blame for adding the annoying “I” bug to your autocorrect in iOS. Learn More on Twitter >

What we’re building.

At work, our inboxes fill up quicker than we can empty them, key decisions are posted and immediately lost in Slack, and we forget the thousands of useful articles we’ve read that could help us do our jobs better. Information overload is wreaking havoc on our ability to process information, make decisions, and be productive.

We’re building Journal to help you remember and find all the important conversations, ideas, and knowledge you need to work faster.

Join our waitlist, and you’ll be one of the first people to get free access to our chrome extension. You’ll never forget important information or lose time recreating work again.

Where we’re going.

Highlight from “AI Ethics and the Race to Bring Pen and Paper Industries Online — A Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures”

Sam: …There are obvious benefits to bringing these processes and datasets online — but I doubt this will always be for the good.

For example, earlier this year the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election integrity sent out a request for voter roll data (name, address, dob, political party, voter history, SSN) from states to “fully analyze vulnerabilities and issues related to voter registration and voting.”

One doesn’t have to think too hard to imagine how this data could be abused to suppress voting from specific populations.

Now that machine learning allows us to process and draw connections between ever larger data sets, how should developers decide which ones are ethical to work on?

Leo: To be honest I don’t have a good answer for this. Everyone has their own code of ethics, and individuals will have to make the personal call as to whether or not they’re okay with the potential impact of the algorithms they build.

Technology is like science in many ways. It has the potential for good. It has the potential for evil.

You can use Google to diagnose if you’re having a heart attack, or to find instructions on bomb making.

It’s up to people building products to think critically about the societal and ethical implications of their work. It’s the unfortunate truth that many things built with the best intentions can be abused for evil. It’s a tough question.

Read the full conversation with Leo Polovets >

Links from the community.

“Job Security: What happens when AI takes over web design?” by Josh Aarons (@joshaarons). Learn More on Noteworthy >
“How Clarifai Buils Accurate and Unbiased AI Technology” submitted by Avi Eisenberger (@aeisenberger). Learn More on Clarifai >
“Business questions engineers should ask when interviewing at ML/AI companies” submitted by Samiur Rahman (@samiur1204). Learn More on Medium >
“Importance Of Bloomberg’s Article On Apple’s AI Headset Project” submitted by Carl DeBrule (@carldebrule). Learn More on Seeking Alpha >

Published at Mon, 13 Nov 2017 18:39:57 +0000

7 0

Deal: BeatsX, Beats Solo3 and Powerbeats3 are on sale for up to 30% off at Apple

Deal: BeatsX, Beats Solo3 and Powerbeats3 are on sale for up to 30% off at Apple

Apple enters the Black Friday fever with a couple of deals that cuts prices on some of the headphones sold via its online and retail stores. Three pairs of headphones are now on sale at Apple Store, so if you’ve been hunting for a great deal on Beats products, then now would be a good time to check them out.

First off, we have the popular BeatsX earphones, which usually sell for $150. Well, Apple now offers the earphones for just $99, so you’ll be saving slightly more than 50 bucks if you take advantage of the deal.

Then, we have the Beats Solo3 Wireless headphones, which Apple has decided to discount by $60 so that customers can buy a pair for just $240. Last but not least, Apple sells the Powerbeats3 Wireless for just $160, exactly $40 cheaper than usual.

For those looking for even better deals, Amazon sells these accessories for a tad cheaper. So, you will be able to get a $50 discount on the BeatsX, a $100 discount on the Beats Solo3 Wireless, and, finally, a $66 discount on the Powerbeats3 Wireless.

Published at Sat, 18 Nov 2017 17:00:00 +0000

16 0

Machine Learnings — Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures

Machine Learnings — Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures

Source

Awesome, not awesome.

#Awesome
Let’s say we offer a $500 monthly plan in which you can tap a button and get access to transportation whenever you want it, and you get to choose your room-on-wheels experience. Maybe you want a cup of coffee on your way to work, or you want to watch the Warriors game later, so you’re in what’s basically a sports bar, with a bartender. If 0.5 percent of all miles driven are done on a ride-sharing app, and then if that number increases to, say, 80 percent, it’ll be such a huge industry shift that even if only 2 percent of that 80 percent is done by human drivers, it still represents a drastic increase in the number of human ride-sharing drivers.”— John Zimmer, Co-Founder and President of LyftLearn More on The New York Times >

#Not Awesome
“She finds the notion of children empathizing with robots troublesome and quite possibly dangerous. Kids need connections to real people in order to mature emotionally. “Pretend empathy does not do the job,” she told me. If relationships with smart toys crowd out those with friends or family, even partially, we might see “children growing up without the equipment for empathic connection. You can’t learn it from a machine.” — Alexis C. Madrigal, Learn More on The Atlantic >

What we’re reading.

1/ When 20% of cars on the road are driven by algorithms, a single catastrophic human vs. machine collision could slow the adoption of autonomous vehicles for many years — but the upsides probably outweigh the downsides. Learn More on The New York Times >

2/ 100% car autonomy presents its own set of problems — but the most apparent? An utter lack of imagination. Social constructs, like cities, are so hardened in our minds that it’s difficult to picture a world that will be quite different from the one we all know. Learn More on The New York Times >

3/ All Algorithms are susceptible to manipulation by bad actors. Google, Facebook, and now YouTube are under fire for what the’ve let slip through their filters — but more stringent filters could make everything so much worse. Learn More on Polygon >

4/ In a world overloaded by information, content creators care above all else that you discover their information. How does it make you feel to know the content you consume exists for the sole reason that you discover it — and nothing deeper? Learn More on BLDGBLOG >

5/ The next time you swipe right in your data apps, you shouldn’t be so sure that you’re not connecting with an AI bot. Learn More on Motherboard >

6/ “Truck drivers” of tomorrow will operate the vehicles carrying their payload from hundreds of miles away from their phone or in front of their computers. Learn More on The Atlantic >

7/ Machine learning is actually to blame for adding the annoying “I” bug to your autocorrect in iOS. Learn More on Twitter >

What we’re building.

At work, our inboxes fill up quicker than we can empty them, key decisions are posted and immediately lost in Slack, and we forget the thousands of useful articles we’ve read that could help us do our jobs better. Information overload is wreaking havoc on our ability to process information, make decisions, and be productive.

We’re building Journal to help you remember and find all the important conversations, ideas, and knowledge you need to work faster.

Join our waitlist, and you’ll be one of the first people to get free access to our chrome extension. You’ll never forget important information or lose time recreating work again.

Where we’re going.

Highlight from “AI Ethics and the Race to Bring Pen and Paper Industries Online — A Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures”

Sam: …There are obvious benefits to bringing these processes and datasets online — but I doubt this will always be for the good.

For example, earlier this year the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election integrity sent out a request for voter roll data (name, address, dob, political party, voter history, SSN) from states to “fully analyze vulnerabilities and issues related to voter registration and voting.”

One doesn’t have to think too hard to imagine how this data could be abused to suppress voting from specific populations.

Now that machine learning allows us to process and draw connections between ever larger data sets, how should developers decide which ones are ethical to work on?

Leo: To be honest I don’t have a good answer for this. Everyone has their own code of ethics, and individuals will have to make the personal call as to whether or not they’re okay with the potential impact of the algorithms they build.

Technology is like science in many ways. It has the potential for good. It has the potential for evil.

You can use Google to diagnose if you’re having a heart attack, or to find instructions on bomb making.

It’s up to people building products to think critically about the societal and ethical implications of their work. It’s the unfortunate truth that many things built with the best intentions can be abused for evil. It’s a tough question.

Read the full conversation with Leo Polovets >

Links from the community.

“Job Security: What happens when AI takes over web design?” by Josh Aarons (@joshaarons). Learn More on Noteworthy >
“How Clarifai Buils Accurate and Unbiased AI Technology” submitted by Avi Eisenberger (@aeisenberger). Learn More on Clarifai >
“Business questions engineers should ask when interviewing at ML/AI companies” submitted by Samiur Rahman (@samiur1204). Learn More on Medium >
“Importance Of Bloomberg’s Article On Apple’s AI Headset Project” submitted by Carl DeBrule (@carldebrule). Learn More on Seeking Alpha >

Published at Mon, 13 Nov 2017 18:39:57 +0000

5 0

Robert Mugabe refuses to quit as Zimbabweans march for his ouster – CNN

Robert Mugabe refuses to quit as Zimbabweans march for his ouster – CNN

Waving placards with slogans like “Mugabe Must Rest Now” and “No to Mugabe Dynasty,” the atmosphere on the streets of the south African nation’s capital was electric, just days after the army put Mugabe under house arrest and detained some of his key political allies.
People waved Zimbabwean flags while others ran alongside army tanks and hugged soldiers to show their gratitude. CNN did not see any police at the protest, which was originally called by the country’s influential association of army veterans.
People march through a street in Harare on Saturday.
A demonstrator carries a sign directed at first lady Grace Mugabe.
“The whole nation is celebrating today. We are finally getting rid of the old man,” said Tanashe, a Harare resident who declined to provide a second name.
Mugabe’s power appears to have finally been brought to check not by the opposition, but by the military and members of his own party, concerned about his apparent plans to have his wife Grace, 52, succeed him.
An army spokesman, speaking with demonstrators near the end of Saturday’s rally, even cast Robert Mugabe as a foe to his own country.
“Yes, we are in uniform, but understand that all we are doing is simply dealing with the enemy of Zimbabwe,” Gen. S.B. Noyo told remnants of the crowd in Harare, as he stood near a tank.
But Mugabe was still refusing to step down on Saturday, an official with direct knowledge of the ongoing negotiations between the President and the military told CNN.
Mugabe was meeting Saturday with army chief Gen. Constantino Chiwenga to discuss what happens next, the source told CNN. Chiwenga is pushing for Mugabe to step down and an interim president to take over, the source said.
Grace under fire: A first lady's ambition cut short
In December, a conference of the ruling ZANU-PF party will take place. It’s assumed that former Vice President Emmerson Mnangagwa will then become leader of the party and President of the country until elections next year, the source said.
ZANU-PF called for Mugabe to resign on Friday, the main state newspaper The Herald reported. It said party branches in all 10 provinces were also calling for the resignation of Grace Mugabe as the women’s league leader.
Zimbabwe’s Indigenization Minister Patrick Zhuwao, who is also Mugabe’s nephew, criticized what he described as the “military siege” underway in the country.
“At the moment Zimbabwe is under military siege and it means nobody is able to express what they want freely. They are acting under coercion. Zimbabwe is currently undergoing a coup and people are trying to sugar coat it,” he told CNN over the phone from South Africa on Saturday.
He added: “Mugabe is willing to die for his principles. He is willing to die to protect the constitution.”

VP’s firing sparked chain reaction

Nicknamed "Ngwena" (The Crocodile) because of his ruthlessness, Emmerson Mnangagwa has held various senior posts in the country's defence and internal security apparatus.
The trigger for what is to all intents and purposes a coup came 10 days ago when Mugabe fired Mnangagwa, a former ally with strong connections and the support of the military who was widely tipped to become the country’s next leader.
The timing, ahead of next year’s presidential vote, fueled speculation that Mugabe was clearing the path for his wife to take over in the event of his retirement or death.
On Wednesday, a military spokesman announced on state television that the army had launched an operation to target “criminals” close to the President who were causing “social and economic suffering.” Mugabe was confined to his multimillion dollar “Blue Roof” mansion.
Mugabe holds talks with army officials and others on Thursday.
Mugabe was photographed Thursday in talks with Gen. Chiwenga and other officials at the official State House. Grace Mugabe has not been seen in public since the military intervention.
On Friday, Mugabe emerged from house arrest to attend a university graduation ceremony in Harare, in a staged public appearance that belied the reality that he is no longer in control.
His appearance was apparently designed to convey a business-as-usual atmosphere — the generals pulling the strings in Harare are desperate not to give the impression they are orchestrating an unconstitutional coup.
Mugabe supporters mull his fate: 'It's as if their father has died'
CNN has learned that Mnangagwa was instrumental in plans to seize control from Mugabe, one of Africa’s longest serving heads of state.
“This takeover was planned a long time ago by Emmerson Mnangagwa and secret discussions did take place with opposition about a succession plan including forcing out Mugabe,” a senior opposition leader with direct knowledge of the talks told CNN.
Opposition leaders have welcomed the developments.

Foreign powers urge restraint

A soldier greets protesters in Harare on Saturday.
An opposition lawmaker called Saturday’s marches a “real turning point.”
“The atmosphere was one of unity and joy. All peaceful an orderly,” said Eddie Cross, a parliament member with the opposition Movement for Democratic Change (MDC-T). “It is a real turning point for all of us.”
In an earlier statement calling on his supporters to join the demonstration, prominent MDC-T politician Douglas Mwonzora said: “While we may have fought and quarreled yesterday, today we are united by what is good for our country.”
“We demand that President Mugabe resigns. But we have to think of tomorrow. The MDC-T demands a mechanism to ensure that the current economic meltdown is redressed. We must bring an end to all the poverty and misery that our people have been consigned to.”
Hundreds of people staged a peaceful protest Saturday outside the State House, the official residence of Mugabe, and there was talk in Zimbabwe of a march to Blue Roof.
Speaking to CNN, Mugabe’s nephew Zhuwao said he feared for the safety of members of the Generation 40 faction of the ZANU-PF party that have remained loyal to the Mugabes.
“I don’t even know if they are still alive,” he said. “This is a coup. The president and first lady are not safe. They are captives.”
Foreign powers have called on the military to show restraint in the upheaval, but have largely supported its actions so far.
US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson described the situation in Zimbabwe as an opportunity for the country.
“Zimbabwe has an opportunity to set itself on a new path, one that must include democratic elections and respect for human rights,” he said Friday at an event in Washington, calling for a quick return to civilian rule.

Published at Sat, 18 Nov 2017 17:04:47 +0000

8 0

Machine Learnings — Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures

Machine Learnings — Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures

Source

Awesome, not awesome.

#Awesome
Let’s say we offer a $500 monthly plan in which you can tap a button and get access to transportation whenever you want it, and you get to choose your room-on-wheels experience. Maybe you want a cup of coffee on your way to work, or you want to watch the Warriors game later, so you’re in what’s basically a sports bar, with a bartender. If 0.5 percent of all miles driven are done on a ride-sharing app, and then if that number increases to, say, 80 percent, it’ll be such a huge industry shift that even if only 2 percent of that 80 percent is done by human drivers, it still represents a drastic increase in the number of human ride-sharing drivers.”— John Zimmer, Co-Founder and President of LyftLearn More on The New York Times >

#Not Awesome
“She finds the notion of children empathizing with robots troublesome and quite possibly dangerous. Kids need connections to real people in order to mature emotionally. “Pretend empathy does not do the job,” she told me. If relationships with smart toys crowd out those with friends or family, even partially, we might see “children growing up without the equipment for empathic connection. You can’t learn it from a machine.” — Alexis C. Madrigal, Learn More on The Atlantic >

What we’re reading.

1/ When 20% of cars on the road are driven by algorithms, a single catastrophic human vs. machine collision could slow the adoption of autonomous vehicles for many years — but the upsides probably outweigh the downsides. Learn More on The New York Times >

2/ 100% car autonomy presents its own set of problems — but the most apparent? An utter lack of imagination. Social constructs, like cities, are so hardened in our minds that it’s difficult to picture a world that will be quite different from the one we all know. Learn More on The New York Times >

3/ All Algorithms are susceptible to manipulation by bad actors. Google, Facebook, and now YouTube are under fire for what the’ve let slip through their filters — but more stringent filters could make everything so much worse. Learn More on Polygon >

4/ In a world overloaded by information, content creators care above all else that you discover their information. How does it make you feel to know the content you consume exists for the sole reason that you discover it — and nothing deeper? Learn More on BLDGBLOG >

5/ The next time you swipe right in your data apps, you shouldn’t be so sure that you’re not connecting with an AI bot. Learn More on Motherboard >

6/ “Truck drivers” of tomorrow will operate the vehicles carrying their payload from hundreds of miles away from their phone or in front of their computers. Learn More on The Atlantic >

7/ Machine learning is actually to blame for adding the annoying “I” bug to your autocorrect in iOS. Learn More on Twitter >

What we’re building.

At work, our inboxes fill up quicker than we can empty them, key decisions are posted and immediately lost in Slack, and we forget the thousands of useful articles we’ve read that could help us do our jobs better. Information overload is wreaking havoc on our ability to process information, make decisions, and be productive.

We’re building Journal to help you remember and find all the important conversations, ideas, and knowledge you need to work faster.

Join our waitlist, and you’ll be one of the first people to get free access to our chrome extension. You’ll never forget important information or lose time recreating work again.

Where we’re going.

Highlight from “AI Ethics and the Race to Bring Pen and Paper Industries Online — A Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures”

Sam: …There are obvious benefits to bringing these processes and datasets online — but I doubt this will always be for the good.

For example, earlier this year the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election integrity sent out a request for voter roll data (name, address, dob, political party, voter history, SSN) from states to “fully analyze vulnerabilities and issues related to voter registration and voting.”

One doesn’t have to think too hard to imagine how this data could be abused to suppress voting from specific populations.

Now that machine learning allows us to process and draw connections between ever larger data sets, how should developers decide which ones are ethical to work on?

Leo: To be honest I don’t have a good answer for this. Everyone has their own code of ethics, and individuals will have to make the personal call as to whether or not they’re okay with the potential impact of the algorithms they build.

Technology is like science in many ways. It has the potential for good. It has the potential for evil.

You can use Google to diagnose if you’re having a heart attack, or to find instructions on bomb making.

It’s up to people building products to think critically about the societal and ethical implications of their work. It’s the unfortunate truth that many things built with the best intentions can be abused for evil. It’s a tough question.

Read the full conversation with Leo Polovets >

Links from the community.

“Job Security: What happens when AI takes over web design?” by Josh Aarons (@joshaarons). Learn More on Noteworthy >
“How Clarifai Buils Accurate and Unbiased AI Technology” submitted by Avi Eisenberger (@aeisenberger). Learn More on Clarifai >
“Business questions engineers should ask when interviewing at ML/AI companies” submitted by Samiur Rahman (@samiur1204). Learn More on Medium >
“Importance Of Bloomberg’s Article On Apple’s AI Headset Project” submitted by Carl DeBrule (@carldebrule). Learn More on Seeking Alpha >

Published at Mon, 13 Nov 2017 18:39:57 +0000

4 0

Jabra Storm review

Jabra Storm review

Let me start by saying this – the Jabra Storm is by far the best Bluetooth headset I’ve ever used. Period. I know there are (arguably) better models, but I haven’t been able to play with one of those.

The Storm offers a great sound quality, it’s easy to carry around (you can forget you have it behind the ear), and it’s battery is solid. Actually, being a fan of the podcasts, I would appreciate that it had a bigger battery, but that would make the entire package heavier, hence not as pleasant to use.

Let’s dive into details, shall we?

Inside the box

Jabra Storm from the side Here’s what’s included inside the compact packaging:

  • Fitted eargel times two – if the default one goes missing or becomes unusable.
  • Windsock for extra voice clarity in windy conditions
  • Standard USB cable for charging
  • Quick start guide and warranty leaflet (with 1-year limited warranty)

In other words, all of the things you would need come included inside the box. So we’re moving on to the next part.

Design

At just 8 grams, the Jabra Storm is a light-weight product that is easy to snug around your ear. The sleek and curved design delivers that “put it and forget it” experience and at some point, you can even wonder whether you’re still using the headset or not.

The device feels solidly built despite being so light. You can wear it behind both ears by simply rotating the speaker and twisting the eargel to fit-in. It uses silicon rubber to make it easier to adjust for comfortable fit.

All of the essential buttons are placed on the silver-colored spine of the Storm, including volume control buttons, call receive/disconnect button and power on/off. The charging connector is covered underneath a small flap.

When I first saw it, I thought the Storm was made for call center agents; but that’s not the case. It’s much smaller and too fancy to be given away to call center staff (pardon my ignorance). 😉

Features

Thanks to the microPOWER battery technology, the Storm has a rated talk time of 10 hours and standby time of 10 days. However, listening to the music and/or some other audio content (like podcasts or audio books) will shorten the battery life. The charging time is 2 hours.

The device has standard operating range of 30 meters based on Bluetooth 4.0 compliance. It can be paired with up to eight devices, while two devices can be concurrently connected for multiuse.

The Storm also features Wind Noise Blackout that keeps delivering the crystal sound even in windy conditions.

As an added bonus, Jabra included voice-activated actions: by default, the Storm will say “To answer call say Yes or No”, which — I’m sad to report — doesn’t work as advertised in a noisy place where the headset will reject or attend the call even before you utter a word. The good thing is that you can disable this feature by pressing the volume down and call button together.

Usage

Using the Jabra Storm is a real pleasure. Aside from those voice controls, everything else is perfect – from the initial pairing to the ongoing use. You get to clearly hear the person on the other end, and the same goes the other way round.

The Wind Noise Blackout technology works like a charm, and when it doesn’t — the wind is too heavy — use the windsock to keep talking like it’s nobody’s business.

Conclusion

I can’t recommend Jabra Storm enough. As I said in the introduction, this is the best Bluetooth headset I’ve ever tried. And honestly, I’m not sure that a more expensive model could deliver much more than what the Storm has to offer. Right now, you can buy it for less than $80; and if you need a Bluetooth headset – go for it!

Published at Fri, 26 Aug 2016 10:06:11 +0000

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A brief tour of Apple Park’s new visitor center [Video]

A brief tour of Apple Park’s new visitor center [Video]

Apple Park’s Visitor Center opened to the public for the first time on Friday, and we’ve already shown you photos from the line, a look at the exclusive merchandise available for purchase, and the immersive AR experience you can try out if you visit. For those unable to visit, we’ve brought you a full video tour of the visitor facility on opening day.

Tweetbot For iOS

Just like the nearby Steve Jobs Theater, Apple Park’s Visitor Center is wrapped entirely with curved panes of floor to ceiling glass that suspend an ultra-light roof, giving the appearance of a floating ceiling. With so much glass, natural light flows through the building as soon as the sun begins to rise. An observation deck on the roof gives visitors a better look across the street at the campus itself.

Many of the design elements of the visitor center are unique to the Apple Park campus, but others, like the 8K video wall at the back of the store, are ideas first used in Apple’s remodeled retail stores for Today At Apple events. Surrounding the visitor center is a courtyard paved with to the curb with a textured pebble material and dotted with trees. Have a look for yourself at the stunning new building in our video below:

Published at Sat, 18 Nov 2017 14:20:30 +0000

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A brief tour of Apple Park’s new visitor center [Video]

A brief tour of Apple Park’s new visitor center [Video]

Apple Park’s Visitor Center opened to the public for the first time on Friday, and we’ve already shown you photos from the line, a look at the exclusive merchandise available for purchase, and the immersive AR experience you can try out if you visit. For those unable to visit, we’ve brought you a full video tour of the visitor facility on opening day.

Tweetbot For iOS

Just like the nearby Steve Jobs Theater, Apple Park’s Visitor Center is wrapped entirely with curved panes of floor to ceiling glass that suspend an ultra-light roof, giving the appearance of a floating ceiling. With so much glass, natural light flows through the building as soon as the sun begins to rise. An observation deck on the roof gives visitors a better look across the street at the campus itself.

Many of the design elements of the visitor center are unique to the Apple Park campus, but others, like the 8K video wall at the back of the store, are ideas first used in Apple’s remodeled retail stores for Today At Apple events. Surrounding the visitor center is a courtyard paved with to the curb with a textured pebble material and dotted with trees. Have a look for yourself at the stunning new building in our video below:

Published at Sat, 18 Nov 2017 14:20:30 +0000

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Jabra Storm review

Jabra Storm review

Let me start by saying this – the Jabra Storm is by far the best Bluetooth headset I’ve ever used. Period. I know there are (arguably) better models, but I haven’t been able to play with one of those.

The Storm offers a great sound quality, it’s easy to carry around (you can forget you have it behind the ear), and it’s battery is solid. Actually, being a fan of the podcasts, I would appreciate that it had a bigger battery, but that would make the entire package heavier, hence not as pleasant to use.

Let’s dive into details, shall we?

Inside the box

Jabra Storm from the side Here’s what’s included inside the compact packaging:

  • Fitted eargel times two – if the default one goes missing or becomes unusable.
  • Windsock for extra voice clarity in windy conditions
  • Standard USB cable for charging
  • Quick start guide and warranty leaflet (with 1-year limited warranty)

In other words, all of the things you would need come included inside the box. So we’re moving on to the next part.

Design

At just 8 grams, the Jabra Storm is a light-weight product that is easy to snug around your ear. The sleek and curved design delivers that “put it and forget it” experience and at some point, you can even wonder whether you’re still using the headset or not.

The device feels solidly built despite being so light. You can wear it behind both ears by simply rotating the speaker and twisting the eargel to fit-in. It uses silicon rubber to make it easier to adjust for comfortable fit.

All of the essential buttons are placed on the silver-colored spine of the Storm, including volume control buttons, call receive/disconnect button and power on/off. The charging connector is covered underneath a small flap.

When I first saw it, I thought the Storm was made for call center agents; but that’s not the case. It’s much smaller and too fancy to be given away to call center staff (pardon my ignorance). 😉

Features

Thanks to the microPOWER battery technology, the Storm has a rated talk time of 10 hours and standby time of 10 days. However, listening to the music and/or some other audio content (like podcasts or audio books) will shorten the battery life. The charging time is 2 hours.

The device has standard operating range of 30 meters based on Bluetooth 4.0 compliance. It can be paired with up to eight devices, while two devices can be concurrently connected for multiuse.

The Storm also features Wind Noise Blackout that keeps delivering the crystal sound even in windy conditions.

As an added bonus, Jabra included voice-activated actions: by default, the Storm will say “To answer call say Yes or No”, which — I’m sad to report — doesn’t work as advertised in a noisy place where the headset will reject or attend the call even before you utter a word. The good thing is that you can disable this feature by pressing the volume down and call button together.

Usage

Using the Jabra Storm is a real pleasure. Aside from those voice controls, everything else is perfect – from the initial pairing to the ongoing use. You get to clearly hear the person on the other end, and the same goes the other way round.

The Wind Noise Blackout technology works like a charm, and when it doesn’t — the wind is too heavy — use the windsock to keep talking like it’s nobody’s business.

Conclusion

I can’t recommend Jabra Storm enough. As I said in the introduction, this is the best Bluetooth headset I’ve ever tried. And honestly, I’m not sure that a more expensive model could deliver much more than what the Storm has to offer. Right now, you can buy it for less than $80; and if you need a Bluetooth headset – go for it!

Published at Fri, 26 Aug 2016 10:06:11 +0000

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