Internet

Firefox’s Quantum Browser Delivers Faster Performance, Lower RAM Usage

Firefox’s Quantum Browser Delivers Faster Performance, Lower RAM Usage

This site may earn affiliate commissions from the links on this page. Terms of use.

Mozilla has been fighting a losing battle against Google Chrome for the past few years. Firefox’s share of the browser market has shrunk dramatically, its once-dominant position chewed down to a minority. All versions of Firefox currently have a 9.1 percent market share, below IE + Edge and Safari. Now, Mozilla has unveiled a new version of their web browser that they hope will rejuvenate their efforts in this area: Firefox Quantum.

Firefox-Market

Mozilla isn’t pulling its PR punches. The organization claims that Firefox Quantum is twice as fast as Firefox from six months ago, built with brand-new technology running native 64-bit, all while using 30 percent less RAM than the competition (read: Chrome). Everything from the UI (now codenamed Photon) to the underlying browser engine (Servo) has been built new, from the ground up. The new engine has been parallelized and should be substantially faster, and Mozilla believes it can use its new Servo engine to enable capabilities like mixed-reality support far more easily than would’ve been possible in the old version.

According to a blog post, Mozilla’s year-long overhaul changed or added over 11 million lines of code, though it’s not clear if “changed” includes “deleted” (presumably it does). The company said 369 bugs related to performance and responsiveness have been fixed, along with 1,190 software bugs “related to the user experience.”

UI comparison between FF55 (Left) and Quantum (Right).

The one thing I don’t really like about Quantum is the browser’s diminished UI gradients, as shown in the image above. I have never liked Microsoft’s decision to embrace a gradient-free future; it makes it harder to navigate options, not easier. It’s one reason I have no plans to upgrade to later versions of Office (that, and Office 2010 works perfectly for what I need it for).

We intended to have our own benchmark suite to show, but my attempts to run some tests on my own system ran into snags. Firefox refused to differentiate properly between two different versions of the browser, even when we consulted guides on dual-browser setup. Our sister site, PCMag, had better luck: Here’s what it reported for overall performance:

On the Speedometer benchmark, the pre-Quantum Firefox release scored 45, compared with 70 for Firefox Quantum. JetStream is one of the most thorough JavaScript benchmarks around, incorporating tests from Google’s Octane and the WebKit Sunspider benchmark. Firefox Quantum scored 151 on JetStream compared with 144 for Google Chrome.

Our own initial tests on Quantum confirm that it feels snappier, though perhaps not as much as we’d have seen under different circumstances. I deleted my old Firefox profile a few months back and created a new one, in an attempt to troubleshoot some problems I was having. It actually worked wonders for the browser’s overall performance level, but that means I’m not seeing much in the way of big gains at the moment. Still, Quantum seems to be a step forward for the Mozilla Foundation and Firefox itself. Hopefully that momentum will translate into increased market share and better competition for Chrome.

Published at Tue, 14 Nov 2017 21:08:48 +0000

14 0

Fiat says plaintiff expert unfit to prove economic loss claims in hacking suit – Reuters


Fiat says plaintiff expert unfit to prove economic loss claims in hacking suit
Reuters
Fiat Chrysler has urged a federal judge to exclude testimony by a researcher whose methodology and background the company said did not reliably support economic damages claimed in a proposed class action alleging cybersecurity vulnerabilities in Jeep …

and more »



Source link

22 0

Coastal: The Sign Shop owner grows business through networking – The Sheboygan Press



The Sheboygan Press

Coastal: The Sign Shop owner grows business through networking
The Sheboygan Press
Networking was also key, something Clark admits he’s not always comfortable doing. “Through my Chamber membership, I was encouraged to attend a networking event,” he said. “The first meeting I was nervous. We had one minute to introduce ourselves …



Source link

9 0

Amazon Key Hack Lets Delivery Drivers Sneak Into Your House Undetected

Amazon Key Hack Lets Delivery Drivers Sneak Into Your House Undetected

This site may earn affiliate commissions from the links on this page. Terms of use.

Amazon’s services have become a big part of many people’s lives, both online and off. Do you trust Amazon enough to let it unlock your doors, though? That’s the pitch for the newly launched Amazon Key service, which allows delivery people set your packages inside under the watchful eye of the Amazon Cloud Cam. However, researchers from Rhino Security Labs have shown it’s possible for a courier to knock your camera offline and sneak back into your home unseen.

The Amazon Key system consists of an Amazon Cloud Cam with smart home add-on and one of several compatible smart locks. The idea is that when a delivery is made by one of Amazon’s in-house drivers, they can access the Key system to unlock your door. The package is placed inside, and the door re-locks. Throughout this process, the Key app lets you know what’s going on with a live video feed. Amazon really sells the camera as peace of mind, but that’s where the weak link is, according to Rhino Security Labs.

In a proof-of-concept hack, researchers showed it’s possible to disable the camera and gain entry to the home without generating any alerts or warnings. You can see the attack carried out in real time below. The courier first opens the door via the Key app and drops off the package. He closes the door, and everything appears to be going normally. Then, a computer is used to send de-authorization commands to the camera over Wi-Fi that spoof signals from the router. This temporarily disconnects the camera, allowing the delivery driver to walk back inside without being on camera.

The deauth attack is not unique to Amazon Key — almost all Wi-Fi devices can be knocked offline temporarily by such a method. However, the Key app doesn’t let the homeowner know something is amiss. The video feed simply shows the last live frame (a closed door). The driver can even re-lock the door after re-entering the home to ensure nothing looks suspicious in the app.

Rhino Security Labs says this attack is extremely easy, noting all you need is a computer or a small handheld Raspberry Pi with an antenna add-on. Amazon has responded to point out all its drivers must pass a background check before making Key deliveries. To address this hack, Amazon says it will push out a Key update that alerts users more quickly to camera disconnections. So, at least you’d know if something suspicious was going on.

Published at Thu, 16 Nov 2017 17:40:55 +0000

23 0

If “networking” is a word you never use, that’s because young professionals today are changing that game – HelloGiggles



HelloGiggles

If “networking” is a word you never use, that’s because young professionals today are changing that game
HelloGiggles
If you’re like us, the word “networking” conjures up images of a bunch of stuffy suits at an awkward mixer, exchanging business cards that will be promptly tossed out. We’re constantly taught about the importance of networking, even though for most of



Source link

16 0

Bamboo shortage gives these lemurs a tougher diet

Bamboo shortage gives these lemurs a tougher diet

Bamboo shortage gives these lemurs a tougher diet

  • These lemurs are now eating culm, the woody trunk of the bamboo, for longer stretches of the year.
  • Researchers first showed that the greater bamboo lemurs are equipped with highly complex and specialized teeth, just as giant pandas are—the only other mammal capable of feeding on culm.
  • Those data showed the lemurs spend 95 percent of their feeding time eating a single species of woody bamboo.
  • Over the past two years, there has been a three month delay in the rainy season and new tender shoots that great bamboo lemurs use for sustenance are appearing in January and February—14 days after the first rainfall, says Patricia Chapple Wright, a primatologist, anthropologist, and conservationist at Stony Brook…
  • In Asia, the geographical ranges of both giant and red pandas are diminished and similarly, in Madagascar, the two larger bamboo lemurs, the greater bamboo lemur and the golden bamboo lemur, have highly restricted distributions within the island.

“Making the lemurs rely on a suboptimal part of their food for just a bit longer may be enough to tip the balance from existence to extinction.”

Human disturbance of tropical rainforests in Madagascar is changing the diets of critically endangered greater bamboo lemurs, report researchers. These lemurs are now eating culm, the woody trunk of the bamboo, for longer stretches of the year.

Ultimately, the researchers report, the dietary constraint will affect the lemurs’ ability to thrive and reproduce and could shorten their lifespan, further pushing them to the brink of extinction.

Researchers first showed that the greater bamboo lemurs are equipped with highly complex and specialized teeth, just as giant pandas are—the only other mammal capable of feeding on culm. Those teeth make it possible for them to consume and survive on woody culm for parts of the year.

A team of scientists spent hours watching them in their natural habitat in Madagascar’s Ranomafana National Park over a period of 18 months, collecting more than 2,000 feeding observation in all. Those data showed the lemurs spend 95 percent of their feeding time eating a single species of woody bamboo. But they only eat the culm from August to November, when dry conditions make tender shoots unavailable.

Findings show rainfalls are changing annually. Over the past two years, there has been a three month delay in the rainy season and new tender shoots that great bamboo lemurs use for sustenance are appearing in January and February—14 days after the first rainfall, says Patricia Chapple Wright, a primatologist, anthropologist, and conservationist at Stony Brook University.

Since new…

Bamboo shortage gives these lemurs a tougher diet

Published at Tue, 14 Nov 2017 18:24:22 +0000

8 0