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Jabra Storm review

Jabra Storm review

Let me start by saying this – the Jabra Storm is by far the best Bluetooth headset I’ve ever used. Period. I know there are (arguably) better models, but I haven’t been able to play with one of those.

The Storm offers a great sound quality, it’s easy to carry around (you can forget you have it behind the ear), and it’s battery is solid. Actually, being a fan of the podcasts, I would appreciate that it had a bigger battery, but that would make the entire package heavier, hence not as pleasant to use.

Let’s dive into details, shall we?

Inside the box

Jabra Storm from the side Here’s what’s included inside the compact packaging:

  • Fitted eargel times two – if the default one goes missing or becomes unusable.
  • Windsock for extra voice clarity in windy conditions
  • Standard USB cable for charging
  • Quick start guide and warranty leaflet (with 1-year limited warranty)

In other words, all of the things you would need come included inside the box. So we’re moving on to the next part.

Design

At just 8 grams, the Jabra Storm is a light-weight product that is easy to snug around your ear. The sleek and curved design delivers that “put it and forget it” experience and at some point, you can even wonder whether you’re still using the headset or not.

The device feels solidly built despite being so light. You can wear it behind both ears by simply rotating the speaker and twisting the eargel to fit-in. It uses silicon rubber to make it easier to adjust for comfortable fit.

All of the essential buttons are placed on the silver-colored spine of the Storm, including volume control buttons, call receive/disconnect button and power on/off. The charging connector is covered underneath a small flap.

When I first saw it, I thought the Storm was made for call center agents; but that’s not the case. It’s much smaller and too fancy to be given away to call center staff (pardon my ignorance). 😉

Features

Thanks to the microPOWER battery technology, the Storm has a rated talk time of 10 hours and standby time of 10 days. However, listening to the music and/or some other audio content (like podcasts or audio books) will shorten the battery life. The charging time is 2 hours.

The device has standard operating range of 30 meters based on Bluetooth 4.0 compliance. It can be paired with up to eight devices, while two devices can be concurrently connected for multiuse.

The Storm also features Wind Noise Blackout that keeps delivering the crystal sound even in windy conditions.

As an added bonus, Jabra included voice-activated actions: by default, the Storm will say “To answer call say Yes or No”, which — I’m sad to report — doesn’t work as advertised in a noisy place where the headset will reject or attend the call even before you utter a word. The good thing is that you can disable this feature by pressing the volume down and call button together.

Usage

Using the Jabra Storm is a real pleasure. Aside from those voice controls, everything else is perfect – from the initial pairing to the ongoing use. You get to clearly hear the person on the other end, and the same goes the other way round.

The Wind Noise Blackout technology works like a charm, and when it doesn’t — the wind is too heavy — use the windsock to keep talking like it’s nobody’s business.

Conclusion

I can’t recommend Jabra Storm enough. As I said in the introduction, this is the best Bluetooth headset I’ve ever tried. And honestly, I’m not sure that a more expensive model could deliver much more than what the Storm has to offer. Right now, you can buy it for less than $80; and if you need a Bluetooth headset – go for it!

Published at Fri, 26 Aug 2016 10:06:11 +0000

19 0

Hands-on with Apple Park Visitor Center’s AR campus experience [Video]

Hands-on with Apple Park Visitor Center’s AR campus experience [Video]

Apple Park’s Visitor Center opened to the general public for the first time today, and one of the features many people are most excited about is an interactive augmented reality experience that Apple has built to show guests what the new campus is all about. We got a hands-on look with the special app to see how it works.

Tweetbot For iOS

Immediately following the introduction of the iPhone X this past September, 9to5Macgot a sneak peak of Apple’s AR demo for the first time. One third of the visitor center building’s main floor is dedicated to a massive aluminum model of Apple Park. The model is crossed with gridlines, providing tracking points for a special ARKit-enabled app that Apple has built in conjunction with the Unreal Engine to work alongside the model.

By using the app, visitors can get a birds-eye glimpse of the entire campus, and even raise the roof of any building and look right inside. The app overlays foliage, lighting effects, and building details onto the plain aluminum model that respond to user important, like changing the time of day. The custom app is installed on special iPads branded with Apple Park iconography on the back instead of the traditional Apple logo. Check out the video and photo gallery below to see the app in action.

Published at Sat, 18 Nov 2017 00:59:30 +0000

12 0

Machine Learnings — Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures

Machine Learnings — Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures

Source

Awesome, not awesome.

#Awesome
Let’s say we offer a $500 monthly plan in which you can tap a button and get access to transportation whenever you want it, and you get to choose your room-on-wheels experience. Maybe you want a cup of coffee on your way to work, or you want to watch the Warriors game later, so you’re in what’s basically a sports bar, with a bartender. If 0.5 percent of all miles driven are done on a ride-sharing app, and then if that number increases to, say, 80 percent, it’ll be such a huge industry shift that even if only 2 percent of that 80 percent is done by human drivers, it still represents a drastic increase in the number of human ride-sharing drivers.”— John Zimmer, Co-Founder and President of LyftLearn More on The New York Times >

#Not Awesome
“She finds the notion of children empathizing with robots troublesome and quite possibly dangerous. Kids need connections to real people in order to mature emotionally. “Pretend empathy does not do the job,” she told me. If relationships with smart toys crowd out those with friends or family, even partially, we might see “children growing up without the equipment for empathic connection. You can’t learn it from a machine.” — Alexis C. Madrigal, Learn More on The Atlantic >

What we’re reading.

1/ When 20% of cars on the road are driven by algorithms, a single catastrophic human vs. machine collision could slow the adoption of autonomous vehicles for many years — but the upsides probably outweigh the downsides. Learn More on The New York Times >

2/ 100% car autonomy presents its own set of problems — but the most apparent? An utter lack of imagination. Social constructs, like cities, are so hardened in our minds that it’s difficult to picture a world that will be quite different from the one we all know. Learn More on The New York Times >

3/ All Algorithms are susceptible to manipulation by bad actors. Google, Facebook, and now YouTube are under fire for what the’ve let slip through their filters — but more stringent filters could make everything so much worse. Learn More on Polygon >

4/ In a world overloaded by information, content creators care above all else that you discover their information. How does it make you feel to know the content you consume exists for the sole reason that you discover it — and nothing deeper? Learn More on BLDGBLOG >

5/ The next time you swipe right in your data apps, you shouldn’t be so sure that you’re not connecting with an AI bot. Learn More on Motherboard >

6/ “Truck drivers” of tomorrow will operate the vehicles carrying their payload from hundreds of miles away from their phone or in front of their computers. Learn More on The Atlantic >

7/ Machine learning is actually to blame for adding the annoying “I” bug to your autocorrect in iOS. Learn More on Twitter >

What we’re building.

At work, our inboxes fill up quicker than we can empty them, key decisions are posted and immediately lost in Slack, and we forget the thousands of useful articles we’ve read that could help us do our jobs better. Information overload is wreaking havoc on our ability to process information, make decisions, and be productive.

We’re building Journal to help you remember and find all the important conversations, ideas, and knowledge you need to work faster.

Join our waitlist, and you’ll be one of the first people to get free access to our chrome extension. You’ll never forget important information or lose time recreating work again.

Where we’re going.

Highlight from “AI Ethics and the Race to Bring Pen and Paper Industries Online — A Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures”

Sam: …There are obvious benefits to bringing these processes and datasets online — but I doubt this will always be for the good.

For example, earlier this year the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election integrity sent out a request for voter roll data (name, address, dob, political party, voter history, SSN) from states to “fully analyze vulnerabilities and issues related to voter registration and voting.”

One doesn’t have to think too hard to imagine how this data could be abused to suppress voting from specific populations.

Now that machine learning allows us to process and draw connections between ever larger data sets, how should developers decide which ones are ethical to work on?

Leo: To be honest I don’t have a good answer for this. Everyone has their own code of ethics, and individuals will have to make the personal call as to whether or not they’re okay with the potential impact of the algorithms they build.

Technology is like science in many ways. It has the potential for good. It has the potential for evil.

You can use Google to diagnose if you’re having a heart attack, or to find instructions on bomb making.

It’s up to people building products to think critically about the societal and ethical implications of their work. It’s the unfortunate truth that many things built with the best intentions can be abused for evil. It’s a tough question.

Read the full conversation with Leo Polovets >

Links from the community.

“Job Security: What happens when AI takes over web design?” by Josh Aarons (@joshaarons). Learn More on Noteworthy >
“How Clarifai Buils Accurate and Unbiased AI Technology” submitted by Avi Eisenberger (@aeisenberger). Learn More on Clarifai >
“Business questions engineers should ask when interviewing at ML/AI companies” submitted by Samiur Rahman (@samiur1204). Learn More on Medium >
“Importance Of Bloomberg’s Article On Apple’s AI Headset Project” submitted by Carl DeBrule (@carldebrule). Learn More on Seeking Alpha >

Published at Mon, 13 Nov 2017 18:39:57 +0000

3 0

Machine Learnings — Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures

Machine Learnings — Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures

Source

Awesome, not awesome.

#Awesome
Let’s say we offer a $500 monthly plan in which you can tap a button and get access to transportation whenever you want it, and you get to choose your room-on-wheels experience. Maybe you want a cup of coffee on your way to work, or you want to watch the Warriors game later, so you’re in what’s basically a sports bar, with a bartender. If 0.5 percent of all miles driven are done on a ride-sharing app, and then if that number increases to, say, 80 percent, it’ll be such a huge industry shift that even if only 2 percent of that 80 percent is done by human drivers, it still represents a drastic increase in the number of human ride-sharing drivers.”— John Zimmer, Co-Founder and President of LyftLearn More on The New York Times >

#Not Awesome
“She finds the notion of children empathizing with robots troublesome and quite possibly dangerous. Kids need connections to real people in order to mature emotionally. “Pretend empathy does not do the job,” she told me. If relationships with smart toys crowd out those with friends or family, even partially, we might see “children growing up without the equipment for empathic connection. You can’t learn it from a machine.” — Alexis C. Madrigal, Learn More on The Atlantic >

What we’re reading.

1/ When 20% of cars on the road are driven by algorithms, a single catastrophic human vs. machine collision could slow the adoption of autonomous vehicles for many years — but the upsides probably outweigh the downsides. Learn More on The New York Times >

2/ 100% car autonomy presents its own set of problems — but the most apparent? An utter lack of imagination. Social constructs, like cities, are so hardened in our minds that it’s difficult to picture a world that will be quite different from the one we all know. Learn More on The New York Times >

3/ All Algorithms are susceptible to manipulation by bad actors. Google, Facebook, and now YouTube are under fire for what the’ve let slip through their filters — but more stringent filters could make everything so much worse. Learn More on Polygon >

4/ In a world overloaded by information, content creators care above all else that you discover their information. How does it make you feel to know the content you consume exists for the sole reason that you discover it — and nothing deeper? Learn More on BLDGBLOG >

5/ The next time you swipe right in your data apps, you shouldn’t be so sure that you’re not connecting with an AI bot. Learn More on Motherboard >

6/ “Truck drivers” of tomorrow will operate the vehicles carrying their payload from hundreds of miles away from their phone or in front of their computers. Learn More on The Atlantic >

7/ Machine learning is actually to blame for adding the annoying “I” bug to your autocorrect in iOS. Learn More on Twitter >

What we’re building.

At work, our inboxes fill up quicker than we can empty them, key decisions are posted and immediately lost in Slack, and we forget the thousands of useful articles we’ve read that could help us do our jobs better. Information overload is wreaking havoc on our ability to process information, make decisions, and be productive.

We’re building Journal to help you remember and find all the important conversations, ideas, and knowledge you need to work faster.

Join our waitlist, and you’ll be one of the first people to get free access to our chrome extension. You’ll never forget important information or lose time recreating work again.

Where we’re going.

Highlight from “AI Ethics and the Race to Bring Pen and Paper Industries Online — A Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures”

Sam: …There are obvious benefits to bringing these processes and datasets online — but I doubt this will always be for the good.

For example, earlier this year the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election integrity sent out a request for voter roll data (name, address, dob, political party, voter history, SSN) from states to “fully analyze vulnerabilities and issues related to voter registration and voting.”

One doesn’t have to think too hard to imagine how this data could be abused to suppress voting from specific populations.

Now that machine learning allows us to process and draw connections between ever larger data sets, how should developers decide which ones are ethical to work on?

Leo: To be honest I don’t have a good answer for this. Everyone has their own code of ethics, and individuals will have to make the personal call as to whether or not they’re okay with the potential impact of the algorithms they build.

Technology is like science in many ways. It has the potential for good. It has the potential for evil.

You can use Google to diagnose if you’re having a heart attack, or to find instructions on bomb making.

It’s up to people building products to think critically about the societal and ethical implications of their work. It’s the unfortunate truth that many things built with the best intentions can be abused for evil. It’s a tough question.

Read the full conversation with Leo Polovets >

Links from the community.

“Job Security: What happens when AI takes over web design?” by Josh Aarons (@joshaarons). Learn More on Noteworthy >
“How Clarifai Buils Accurate and Unbiased AI Technology” submitted by Avi Eisenberger (@aeisenberger). Learn More on Clarifai >
“Business questions engineers should ask when interviewing at ML/AI companies” submitted by Samiur Rahman (@samiur1204). Learn More on Medium >
“Importance Of Bloomberg’s Article On Apple’s AI Headset Project” submitted by Carl DeBrule (@carldebrule). Learn More on Seeking Alpha >

Published at Mon, 13 Nov 2017 18:39:57 +0000

3 0

Machine Learnings — Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures

Machine Learnings — Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures

Source

Awesome, not awesome.

#Awesome
Let’s say we offer a $500 monthly plan in which you can tap a button and get access to transportation whenever you want it, and you get to choose your room-on-wheels experience. Maybe you want a cup of coffee on your way to work, or you want to watch the Warriors game later, so you’re in what’s basically a sports bar, with a bartender. If 0.5 percent of all miles driven are done on a ride-sharing app, and then if that number increases to, say, 80 percent, it’ll be such a huge industry shift that even if only 2 percent of that 80 percent is done by human drivers, it still represents a drastic increase in the number of human ride-sharing drivers.”— John Zimmer, Co-Founder and President of LyftLearn More on The New York Times >

#Not Awesome
“She finds the notion of children empathizing with robots troublesome and quite possibly dangerous. Kids need connections to real people in order to mature emotionally. “Pretend empathy does not do the job,” she told me. If relationships with smart toys crowd out those with friends or family, even partially, we might see “children growing up without the equipment for empathic connection. You can’t learn it from a machine.” — Alexis C. Madrigal, Learn More on The Atlantic >

What we’re reading.

1/ When 20% of cars on the road are driven by algorithms, a single catastrophic human vs. machine collision could slow the adoption of autonomous vehicles for many years — but the upsides probably outweigh the downsides. Learn More on The New York Times >

2/ 100% car autonomy presents its own set of problems — but the most apparent? An utter lack of imagination. Social constructs, like cities, are so hardened in our minds that it’s difficult to picture a world that will be quite different from the one we all know. Learn More on The New York Times >

3/ All Algorithms are susceptible to manipulation by bad actors. Google, Facebook, and now YouTube are under fire for what the’ve let slip through their filters — but more stringent filters could make everything so much worse. Learn More on Polygon >

4/ In a world overloaded by information, content creators care above all else that you discover their information. How does it make you feel to know the content you consume exists for the sole reason that you discover it — and nothing deeper? Learn More on BLDGBLOG >

5/ The next time you swipe right in your data apps, you shouldn’t be so sure that you’re not connecting with an AI bot. Learn More on Motherboard >

6/ “Truck drivers” of tomorrow will operate the vehicles carrying their payload from hundreds of miles away from their phone or in front of their computers. Learn More on The Atlantic >

7/ Machine learning is actually to blame for adding the annoying “I” bug to your autocorrect in iOS. Learn More on Twitter >

What we’re building.

At work, our inboxes fill up quicker than we can empty them, key decisions are posted and immediately lost in Slack, and we forget the thousands of useful articles we’ve read that could help us do our jobs better. Information overload is wreaking havoc on our ability to process information, make decisions, and be productive.

We’re building Journal to help you remember and find all the important conversations, ideas, and knowledge you need to work faster.

Join our waitlist, and you’ll be one of the first people to get free access to our chrome extension. You’ll never forget important information or lose time recreating work again.

Where we’re going.

Highlight from “AI Ethics and the Race to Bring Pen and Paper Industries Online — A Conversation with Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures”

Sam: …There are obvious benefits to bringing these processes and datasets online — but I doubt this will always be for the good.

For example, earlier this year the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election integrity sent out a request for voter roll data (name, address, dob, political party, voter history, SSN) from states to “fully analyze vulnerabilities and issues related to voter registration and voting.”

One doesn’t have to think too hard to imagine how this data could be abused to suppress voting from specific populations.

Now that machine learning allows us to process and draw connections between ever larger data sets, how should developers decide which ones are ethical to work on?

Leo: To be honest I don’t have a good answer for this. Everyone has their own code of ethics, and individuals will have to make the personal call as to whether or not they’re okay with the potential impact of the algorithms they build.

Technology is like science in many ways. It has the potential for good. It has the potential for evil.

You can use Google to diagnose if you’re having a heart attack, or to find instructions on bomb making.

It’s up to people building products to think critically about the societal and ethical implications of their work. It’s the unfortunate truth that many things built with the best intentions can be abused for evil. It’s a tough question.

Read the full conversation with Leo Polovets >

Links from the community.

“Job Security: What happens when AI takes over web design?” by Josh Aarons (@joshaarons). Learn More on Noteworthy >
“How Clarifai Buils Accurate and Unbiased AI Technology” submitted by Avi Eisenberger (@aeisenberger). Learn More on Clarifai >
“Business questions engineers should ask when interviewing at ML/AI companies” submitted by Samiur Rahman (@samiur1204). Learn More on Medium >
“Importance Of Bloomberg’s Article On Apple’s AI Headset Project” submitted by Carl DeBrule (@carldebrule). Learn More on Seeking Alpha >

Published at Mon, 13 Nov 2017 18:39:57 +0000

12 0

Hands-on with Apple Park Visitor Center’s AR campus experience [Video]

Hands-on with Apple Park Visitor Center’s AR campus experience [Video]

Apple Park’s Visitor Center opened to the general public for the first time today, and one of the features many people are most excited about is an interactive augmented reality experience that Apple has built to show guests what the new campus is all about. We got a hands-on look with the special app to see how it works.

Tweetbot For iOS

Immediately following the introduction of the iPhone X this past September, 9to5Macgot a sneak peak of Apple’s AR demo for the first time. One third of the visitor center building’s main floor is dedicated to a massive aluminum model of Apple Park. The model is crossed with gridlines, providing tracking points for a special ARKit-enabled app that Apple has built in conjunction with the Unreal Engine to work alongside the model.

By using the app, visitors can get a birds-eye glimpse of the entire campus, and even raise the roof of any building and look right inside. The app overlays foliage, lighting effects, and building details onto the plain aluminum model that respond to user important, like changing the time of day. The custom app is installed on special iPads branded with Apple Park iconography on the back instead of the traditional Apple logo. Check out the video and photo gallery below to see the app in action.

Published at Sat, 18 Nov 2017 00:59:30 +0000

14 0

2018 Kia Stinger vs. other premium liftbacks by the numbers

2018 Kia Stinger vs. other premium liftbacks by the numbers

Ten years ago, if you had told us that one of the many new luxury segments to develop would be sedan-style hatchbacks, we’d have said you’d lost your mind. And yet, here we are today with not one, but four competing in just such a niche segment: The Kia Stinger, Buick Regal Sportback, BMW 3 Series Gran Turismo and Audi A5. That’s just in one size and price bracket. Two of the manufacturers listed here make larger versions of each hatchback. We aren’t entirely sure how it happened, but we’re not going to complain, because we love the idea of a car with almost no compromise: luxury features, sporty performance, and plenty of practicality.

One of the reasons we’re taking a look at these cars right now is that Kia has recently released pricing for its entry in the segment, the Stinger and Stinger GT. Buick wasn’t far behind with the Regal Sportback and Regal GS, nor was Audi with the A5 and S5. So it seemed like an appropriate moment to look at the numbers and see which come out ahead or behind, with victors in each category highlighted with bold and underlined text.

Premium liftback specs

What we found when comparing these cars’ statistics is that each one has a clear area of expertise. For performance, it’s hard to beat the four-cylinder Kia Stinger and the V6 Stinger GT. The four-banger has the most horsepower of the four cars, and is just behind on torque. The V6 has the most power and torque among the six-cylinder versions. The Stingers are also the second lightest of the group when equipped with rear-wheel drive, though they fall to third with all-wheel drive.

Space is a split between the Buick Regals and BMW 3 Series Gran Turismos. The Buicks have the most cargo space with the rear seats up or folded by a significant margin. The BMW on the other hand generally offers more space for passengers. It’s up to you what’s most important.

When it comes to cost, nothing can beat the four-cylinder Regal’s base price of under $26,000. But if a V6 is what you’re after, the Stinger GT is the cheapest. Neither matches the Audi A5 and S5 for fuel economy, though. Both Audis have the highest numbers for city, highway, and combined EPA estimates.

Related Video:

Published at Fri, 17 Nov 2017 23:15:00 +0000

6 0

Hands-on with Apple Park Visitor Center’s AR campus experience [Video]

Hands-on with Apple Park Visitor Center’s AR campus experience [Video]

Apple Park’s Visitor Center opened to the general public for the first time today, and one of the features many people are most excited about is an interactive augmented reality experience that Apple has built to show guests what the new campus is all about. We got a hands-on look with the special app to see how it works.

Tweetbot For iOS

Immediately following the introduction of the iPhone X this past September, 9to5Macgot a sneak peak of Apple’s AR demo for the first time. One third of the visitor center building’s main floor is dedicated to a massive aluminum model of Apple Park. The model is crossed with gridlines, providing tracking points for a special ARKit-enabled app that Apple has built in conjunction with the Unreal Engine to work alongside the model.

By using the app, visitors can get a birds-eye glimpse of the entire campus, and even raise the roof of any building and look right inside. The app overlays foliage, lighting effects, and building details onto the plain aluminum model that respond to user important, like changing the time of day. The custom app is installed on special iPads branded with Apple Park iconography on the back instead of the traditional Apple logo. Check out the video and photo gallery below to see the app in action.

Published at Sat, 18 Nov 2017 00:59:30 +0000

15 0

Alabama's GOP governor says she plans to vote for Roy Moore – Washington Post

Alabama's GOP governor says she plans to vote for Roy Moore – Washington Post


Alabama Republican Senate nominee Roy Moore and wife Kayla arrive to participate in the Mid-Alabama Republican Club’s Veterans Day Program in Vestavia Hills, Ala., on Nov. 11. (Marvin Gentry/Reuters)

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey (R) said Friday that she plans to vote for embattled GOP nominee Roy Moore for Senate, even as she said she has “no reason to disbelieve” the women who have accused him of sexual misconduct.

Ivey made her comments on the same day that Moore’s wife Kayla Moore said that her husband would not bow out of the contest, despite Senate Republican leaders vigorously urging him to do so.

By day’s end, it appeared increasingly that the effort by Senate GOP leaders to force Moore out of the race or rally the party behind an alternative contender was gaining little, if any, traction.

“I will cast my ballot on December the 12,” Ivey told reporters. “And I do believe that the nominee of the party is the one I will vote for.”

She attributed her decision to a desire to preserve the advantage Republicans hold over Democrats in the Senate, which has enabled them to advance key judicial nominations and other elements of the GOP agenda.

“We need to have a Republican in the United States Senate to vote on the things like Supreme Court justices,” Ivey said.

Republicans hold a 52-48 Senate majority.

Ivey said she saw “no reason” to move the date of the election, a possibility some have raised as a last-gasp try by party leaders to prevent Moore from being elected.

Ivey became governor this year following the resignation of Robert Bentley, also a Republican. Ivey faces an election of her own in 2018.

Moore has been accused by two women of initiating unwanted sexual encounters when he was in his 30s and they were 14 and 16. Moore has denied the allegations. Other women have said he pursued them when they were teenagers and he was in his 30s.

Asked about the allegations, Ivey responded, “I certainly have no reason to disbelieve any of them.” But, she questioned the timing of them, calling it: “a little curious.”

On the whole, prominent Alabama Republican officials and organizations, including the state party, have stood by Moore. The rare exception: The Greater Birmingham Young Republicans, who have pulled their support.

Speaking on the steps of the state Capitol here before several dozen women, and after several previous speakers, Kayla Moore definitively said her husband would not bow out of the contest.

“He will not step down. He will not stop fighting for the people of Alabama,” she said.

Kayla Moore thanked backers for their support. And she apologized for not being able to reply to all the well-wishers.

“Most of the negative has been from out of state . . .  The people of Alabama know what is going on here,” she said.

Democratic nominee Doug Jones, who campaigned in the southeastern part of the state on Friday, criticized Ivey’s justification for supporting Moore.

“I think it’s pretty sad that anybody would put partisan politics over the good of the state and the good of the country,” said Jones.

Some public and private polls released this week have shown Jones with a lead.

Sullivan reported from Dothan, Ala.

Published at Fri, 17 Nov 2017 23:48:45 +0000

8 0

Alabama's GOP governor says she plans to vote for Roy Moore – Washington Post

Alabama's GOP governor says she plans to vote for Roy Moore – Washington Post


Alabama Republican Senate nominee Roy Moore and wife Kayla arrive to participate in the Mid-Alabama Republican Club’s Veterans Day Program in Vestavia Hills, Ala., on Nov. 11. (Marvin Gentry/Reuters)

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey (R) said Friday that she plans to vote for embattled GOP nominee Roy Moore for Senate, even as she said she has “no reason to disbelieve” the women who have accused him of sexual misconduct.

Ivey made her comments on the same day that Moore’s wife Kayla Moore said that her husband would not bow out of the contest, despite Senate Republican leaders vigorously urging him to do so.

By day’s end, it appeared increasingly that the effort by Senate GOP leaders to force Moore out of the race or rally the party behind an alternative contender was gaining little, if any, traction.

“I will cast my ballot on December the 12,” Ivey told reporters. “And I do believe that the nominee of the party is the one I will vote for.”

She attributed her decision to a desire to preserve the advantage Republicans hold over Democrats in the Senate, which has enabled them to advance key judicial nominations and other elements of the GOP agenda.

“We need to have a Republican in the United States Senate to vote on the things like Supreme Court justices,” Ivey said.

Republicans hold a 52-48 Senate majority.

Ivey said she saw “no reason” to move the date of the election, a possibility some have raised as a last-gasp try by party leaders to prevent Moore from being elected.

Ivey became governor this year following the resignation of Robert Bentley, also a Republican. Ivey faces an election of her own in 2018.

Moore has been accused by two women of initiating unwanted sexual encounters when he was in his 30s and they were 14 and 16. Moore has denied the allegations. Other women have said he pursued them when they were teenagers and he was in his 30s.

Asked about the allegations, Ivey responded, “I certainly have no reason to disbelieve any of them.” But, she questioned the timing of them, calling it: “a little curious.”

On the whole, prominent Alabama Republican officials and organizations, including the state party, have stood by Moore. The rare exception: The Greater Birmingham Young Republicans, who have pulled their support.

Speaking on the steps of the state Capitol here before several dozen women, and after several previous speakers, Kayla Moore definitively said her husband would not bow out of the contest.

“He will not step down. He will not stop fighting for the people of Alabama,” she said.

Kayla Moore thanked backers for their support. And she apologized for not being able to reply to all the well-wishers.

“Most of the negative has been from out of state . . .  The people of Alabama know what is going on here,” she said.

Democratic nominee Doug Jones, who campaigned in the southeastern part of the state on Friday, criticized Ivey’s justification for supporting Moore.

“I think it’s pretty sad that anybody would put partisan politics over the good of the state and the good of the country,” said Jones.

Some public and private polls released this week have shown Jones with a lead.

Sullivan reported from Dothan, Ala.

Published at Fri, 17 Nov 2017 23:48:45 +0000

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